Laurels

Best Yoga Studios
2022

The Best Yoga Studios
Here Are The Top Yoga Studios
Nina's Yoga and Wellness Studio

Nina's Yoga and Wellness Studio

Nina's Yoga and Wellness Studio holds classes for yoga practitioners from Cincinnati and the surrounding areas. It offers classes on various yoga styles, such as hatha, power flow, soul flow, and vinyasa. It also hosts sessions for yin yoga, which targets an individual's deep connective tissues, including bones, joints, fascia, and ligaments. Nina, one of the studio's yoga teachers, is a certified life and health coach. She maintains a passion for helping and teaching clients the benefits of yoga therapy through meditation and practice.

Cincinnati, OH 45202

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Practice Yoga Cincinnati

Practice Yoga Cincinnati

Practice Yoga Cincinnati is serving clients in the area. It provides various yoga classes, including vinyasa flow, power flow, grounded flow, and evening Hatha. It also offers restorative, recovery, yin, and Bootcamp sessions. Its classes conduct sun salutations as a warm-up or a main part of the practice. The classes provided are non-heated, heated, and warm. Moreover, the studio features two unisex bathrooms and showers. It was established eight years ago under the name, Simply Power Yoga.

Cincinnati, OH 45230

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Body Alive Oakley

Body Alive Oakley

Body Alive Oakley is a yoga and fitness studio that caters to residents of Cincinnati. It offers both traditional and heated yoga classes, such as hot pilates, power yoga, and introductory classes. The studio can host individual yoga sessions and class workouts, either with an instructor or a recorded video routine. Its facility comes with a dressing room and a locker room. Body Alive Oakley is a branch of Body Alive Fitness, which was founded by Stephanie Bain and employs ACE-certified instructors.

Cincinnati, OH 45209

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Embra

Embra

Embra is a yoga and wellness studio that caters to clients in Cincinnati. Its offers different types of yoga classes, including hot yin yoga, hot Vinyasa flow yoga, and hot yoga flow classes ending with 20-minute Yin restorative poses. It also offers slower-paced vinyasa flow yoga in the heated room, and community yoga, which is accessible to all levels. Its fusion classes include cardio barre, hot fusion Pilates, and hot Vinyasa barre. Additionally, the studio provides a six-month interactive teacher training program for those interested in teaching.

Cincinnati, OH 45226

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Sage Yoga Hot

Sage Yoga Hot

Sage Yoga Hot is a Cincinnati yoga studio that offers various classes, including vinyasa, yin, and power yoga styles. The studio is equipped with infrared heating panels for temperature control, as well as accessorial products like burning sage, Bala bangles, cork yoga mats, practice accessories, and natural food items. Aspiring instructors can contact Sage Yoga Hot to avail of its yoga teacher training program, which includes training in hot vinyasa, non-heated Hatha, yin, and restorative yoga.

Cincinnati, OH 45202

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Hello Sunshine Yoga

Hello Sunshine Yoga

Established in 2019, Hello Sunshine Yoga is a movement studio and community serving clients in Cincinnati and nearby areas. Its yin yoga classes target the deeper connective tissue of the joints to stimulate blood flow, relieve stress, and increase mobility. The studio also offers online classes. Hollie Nesbitt, the studio’s owner, is a barre fitness and aerial yoga teacher trainer. She has completed over 5,000 hours of teaching experience. Nesbitt also teaches prenatal yoga.

Cincinnati, OH 45213

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Define

Define

Founded by Henry Richardson, Define is a wellness studio that caters to clients in Cincinnati. Its classes provide a holistic lifestyle approach for clients, taking into consideration both body and mind. Its yoga, ball-rolling, and hammock classes help increase students' mobility and stability, protect the body from injury, improve athletic performance, and maintain a balanced metabolism. Define also offers core-focused whole-body workouts and an indoor cycling class. Richardson conceived Define's integrated body-mind concept through his own personal pain management.

Cincinnati, OH 45209

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Mysore Cincinnati Ashtanga Yoga

Mysore Cincinnati Ashtanga Yoga

Serving the metro and nearby areas, Mysore Cincinnati Ashtanga Yoga is an established shala and traditional institution that provides classes to people who are new to yoga. The facility uses an ashtanga metric, a type of practice for healing, daily, and therapeutic training. Mysore Cincinnati Ashtanga Yoga also offers the Mysore Cincinnati program, a single, comprehensive yoga practice that allows clients to move at their own pace and focus. One of its teachers, Kim Nietch, is known internationally by SYC/KPJAYI in the metro.

Cincinnati, OH 45226

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True Freedom Recovery Yoga

True Freedom Recovery Yoga

True Freedom Recovery Yoga is a not-for-profit yoga studio welcoming learners from all over Cincinnati. Dedicated to yoga philosophy, it offers a wide array of programs to help people from different backgrounds achieve health, contentment, and peace of mind. It has built a community of people interested in growing together and getting in touch with their true selves. The studio is an arm of A Policy of Caring, Inc. that facilitates training on the art of being alive.

Cincinnati, OH 45212

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The Yoga Groove

The Yoga Groove

The Yoga Groove is a studio that serves individuals in greater Cincinnati and beyond. The studio offers gentle and beginner classes that are inclusive and adaptable to most abilities plus gentle barre, and yin yoga. Classes are available in private and group sessions in studio or via Zoom. Its group classes are designed to help individuals gain strength, improve posture, learn focused breathing, and meditation. These classes also allow individuals to achieve improved physical and mental health through therapeutic yoga and improved self-care. Owner and instructor Sharon Byrnes has been teaching for over 30 years. She holds several designations, including YACEP, E-RYT 500, and CIAYT. She is an “Accessible Yoga Ambassador” and a senior teacher with Svastha Yoga Therapy and Ayurveda.

Cincinnati, OH 45226

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Expert Answers To Common Questions:

  1. Introduction
  2. What is yoga?
  3. What does yoga mean?
  4. Where did yoga originate?
  5. What is the difference between yoga and Pilates?
  6. What is goat yoga?
  7. Is yoga good for you?
  8. Does yoga help you lose weight?
  9. Is yoga a good workout?
  10. What does yoga help with?
  11. What does yoga do for your body?
  12. How to do yoga?
  13. What should I wear to yoga?
  14. What should I wear to hot yoga?
  15. How do you clean a yoga mat?
  16. How much do yoga instructors make?
  17. How does someone become a yoga instructor?
Q: Introduction
A:
Yoga is a type of physical exercise that has been practiced for over 5,000 years. It originated in southeast Asia and was first practiced as a way for individuals to bring balance to mind, body, and spirit. Yoga has long been associated with spirituality, and many instructors close out classes with guided meditations.

Today's yoga differs from its early beginnings, as instructors incorporate more physical exercise to help students get in shape and lose weight. Power yoga is one example of a newer type of yoga meant for physical fitness. Types of yoga include Hatha, a relaxing practice, Kundalini, a practice designed to ignite internal energy, and Vinyasa, which utilizes multiple poses.
Q: What is yoga?
A:
Yoga is a physical practice that's deeply established in Indian culture and philosophy. The practice consists of physical poses and breathing techniques designed to bring the mind and body together, promote relaxation, and strengthen the muscles. In today's world, many people practice yoga for both relaxation and physical fitness.
Q: What does yoga mean?
A:
The word yoga comes from the Sanskrit root yuj, which translates to unite or yoke. This means to bring the mind, body, and spirit together. People have practiced yoga for thousands of years. The main objective of the practice is to promote inner peace and balance, and many practitioners utilize yoga to get in shape both physically and mentally.
Q: Where did yoga originate?
A:
Yoga originated in the northwestern regions of Southeast Asia over 5,000 years ago. Soapstone seals and fossil remains found by researchers featured yogic symbols and were believed to be related to the Indus Saraswati valley civilization. Gurus taught yoga and focused on its spiritual rituals, with poses such as the Sun Salute, in which practitioners honor the sun.
Q: What is the difference between yoga and Pilates?
A:
While yoga and Pilates are both a type of low-impact exercise, the practice of yoga is based on spiritual and meditative principles, and Pilates is more focused on engaging and strengthening the body's core. Pilates does incorporate some yoga techniques, including deep breathing and stretching.
Q: What is goat yoga?
A:
Goat yoga is a form of yoga in which students and practitioners perform common poses while goats roam around. Goats sometimes stand on students' backs and stomachs during poses, such as plank and child's pose. The practice was invented on a farm in Oregon, and the goats offer a calming presence during class.
Q: Is yoga good for you?
A:
Yoga offers a wide range of benefits, including increased relaxation, a mind and body connection, and strengthened muscles. Many students experience strong feelings of inner peace during poses and meditations at the end of each session, and yoga can also aid in weight loss and pain reduction.
Q: Does yoga help you lose weight?
A:
Yoga helps people lose weight by lowering cortisol levels in the body. Cortisol is a stress hormone that's linked to weight gain in the abdominal area. Yoga also promotes mindfulness, which helps students and practitioners focus on healthier eating habits. Additionally, yoga helps strengthen muscles, which in turn can lead to a leaner figure.
Q: Is yoga a good workout?
A:
Yoga classes offer a good workout by toning the muscles throughout the body, similar to weight training. Students are required to hold yoga poses for extended lengths of time, which helps increase muscle endurance. Vinyasa yoga raises the heart rate, which improves calorie burn.
Q: What does yoga help with?
A:
Yoga helps promote relaxation and reduce stress, and it helps tone and elongate muscles. Holding yoga poses for extended amounts of time helps students achieve balance throughout the body, and different poses can help ease muscle tension by gently stretching the muscles. Deep breathing in yoga helps increase blood flow, and inverted poses improve blood flow to the extremities.
Q: What does yoga do for your body?
A:
Yoga is a beneficial practice that helps the body in many ways. Deep breathing techniques utilized during poses help people become balanced and focused, while stretches help soothe muscles and release tension. Poses, such as Downward Dog and Warrior, elongate and strengthen the arm and leg muscles, and meditation at the end of practice helps promote restful sleep.
Q: How to do yoga?
A:
To perform a Forward Fold pose, students first stand up straight and then bend down towards the floor using the hips and waist. Downward Dog pose starts with a forward fold, followed by walking the arms further away from the shoulders until the arms and legs are at opposite angles. Corpse pose consists of lying flat on the back with arms at the sides.
Q: What should I wear to yoga?
A:
When attending a yoga class, it's always a good idea to wear comfortable, breathable clothes. Many sporting goods stores sell workout gear specifically designed for yoga, including pants, tops, and yoga socks that easily grip bare flooring. Some students also prefer to go barefoot during yoga class.
Q: What should I wear to hot yoga?
A:
Indoor temperatures during a hot yoga class can range between 80 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so it's important to wear breathable clothing. T-shirts over tank tops are also a good idea, as layers can be removed as the body warms up.
Q: How do you clean a yoga mat?
A:
Yoga mats should be cleaned by hand with mild soap and warm water, then thoroughly rinsed to prevent soap residue buildup. Another option is to submerge the mat in warm, soapy water. Once dried, you can also spray the yoga mat with disinfectant spray to freshen it up and eliminate potential lingering germs and bacteria.
Q: How much do yoga instructors make?
A:
The pay rate for yoga instructors varies greatly depending on the type of yoga classes being taught, experience levels, and price points dictated by yoga practitioners. In general, a yoga teacher's salary at a yoga studio ranges between $31 and $35 per hour.
Q: How does someone become a yoga instructor?
A:
To become a yoga instructor, one must first complete a yoga teacher training course or YTTC. There are several course programs ranging from 200 to 500 total hours. Once certified, yoga instructors can train students as independent contractors, work in gyms, and open their own yoga studios. Since there are several types of yoga, instructors can build their skill sets with continuing education courses.