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Best Wedding Officiants
2022

The Best Wedding Officiants
Here Are The Top Wedding Officiants
Jeddah Vailakis

Jeddah Vailakis

Jeddah Vailakis, based in New York City, weds couples throughout the boroughs and the surrounding areas. Ms. Vailakis began officiating ceremonies in 2002 when her then-mentor asked her to take on a wedding with over 350 guests. Ms. Vailakis revels in telling stories about how couples met and fell in love, and, on the day of the ceremony, she specializes in helping couples relax and be actually present for the experience.

New York, NY 10016

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Website
Ceremony of a Lifetime - Tullis McCall

Ceremony of a Lifetime - Tullis McCall

Ceremony of a Lifetime - Tullis McCall is a New York wedding celebrant, who is available for weddings big and small, customized to the couple's specifications. Ms. McCall sees her role as collaborating with the couple to design the perfect ceremony, and additionally, to ease nerves on the big day. In 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016, Ms. McCall received "Couples' Choice Awards" from the rating website WeddingWire.

New York, NY 10027

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Website
Weddings by Larissa

Weddings by Larissa

Weddings by Larissa is a Queens Villa business handling ceremonies in New York City and other nearby cities. A certified Life-Cycle Wedding Celebrant, Larissa is available for services throughout the New York City tri-state area, and she has worked with numerous same-sex couples. She has received the "Couples' Choice" honor from WeddingWire, and, as a writer, excels at the speechwriting that goes into successfully officiating wedding ceremonies.

Queens Village, NY 11428

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Website
Rev. Annie Lawrence

Rev. Annie Lawrence

Rev. Annie Lawrence is a wedding officiant in New York, available throughout the city and the surrounding areas. Since beginning her career as an ordained Interfaith Minister, she has officiated more than 1,000 ceremonies, including traditional ceremonies as well as such alternative varieties as civil, spiritual, secular, and humanist. She has married couples all across the U.S. and, indeed, has officiated weddings across the world, in the U.K., Australia, Canada, Germany, France, and Sweden.

New York, NY 10012

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Website
Wedding Solution

Wedding Solution

Wedding Solution is a New York wedding officiant service operating mainly in Manhattan but also delivering its services throughout the city as well as its suburbs. Packages begin at $1,200, which includes helping couples obtain a marriage license, as well as guiding them through any requisite paperwork and customizing the ceremony to their exact specifications.

New York, NY 10019

Website

Website
Alice Soloway Weddings

Alice Soloway Weddings

Alice Soloway Weddings is a Brooklyn-based wedding officiant and celebrant with over 10 years of experience serving couples in NYC, Westchester, and the Hudson Valley. Alice Soloway is a native New Yorker and Certified Life Cycle Celebrant, trained by the Celebrant Foundation and Institute. Ms. Soloway can coordinate and write the script for many forms of weddings, from simple ceremonies and elopements to lavish and unique occasions. Services also include script design consultations for weddings officiated by friends or family.

Brooklyn, NY 11226

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Website
Officiant NYC

Officiant NYC

Officiant NYC is a New York team of wedding officiants that has overseen the weddings of more than 700 couples. Each member of the staff is an ordained interfaith minister. Officiants Kim Worley, Suanne Bonan, Mirelle Eid, Caitlin Northcote, Sarah Smart, Rebecca Sands, and Annette Polovin come from a variety of professional backgrounds, from acting and public speaking to faith-based community service.

New York, NY 10011

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Website
One Heart Ceremonies

One Heart Ceremonies

One Heart Ceremonies, in New York, is a team of ordained wedding officiators, interfaith ministers, and ceremony consultants. The business, which has one office in NYC and another in Rockland, operates throughout the Tri-State Region, across the U.S., and all over the world. Every single year from 2011 to 2016, One Heart Ceremonies has won the"Best of Weddings Award" from The Knot and the "Couples' Choice Award" from WeddingWire. Each of the company's two officiants has more than a quarter-century of experience.

New York, NY 10128

Website

Website
Illuminating Ceremonies

Illuminating Ceremonies

As the owner and operator of Illuminating Ceremonies, in New York City, Christopher Shelley serves as a wedding officiant and life-cycle celebrant for marrying couples in and around the city. In addition to being available statewide, Mr. Shelley is licensed to perform ceremonies in New Jersey, Ohio, and Kentucky, among other states. He became a Certified Life-Cycle Celebrant in 2012, at the conclusion of his studies at the Celebrant Foundation & Institute. Mr. Shelly excels at writing and public speaking, making him a strong choice for clients looking to customize their wedding ceremony.

New York, NY 10019

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Website
Wedding Your Way New York

Wedding Your Way New York

Wedding Your Way New York is a New York City-based wedding network of wedding officiants, providing affordable and customizable ceremonies throughout the area. The team consists of several Humanist Celebrants, all authorized by the Humanist Society to oversee weddings in any of the five boroughs. Since 1996, the staff has provided traditional, contemporary, and multicultural options, and it prides itself on inclusivity, offering its services to same-sex couples.

New York, NY 10280

Website

Website

Expert Answers To Common Questions:

  1. Introduction
  2. What is a wedding officiant?
  3. What does a wedding officiant do?
  4. Can you officiate your own wedding?
  5. What do you call a person who officiates a wedding?
  6. Who can officiate a wedding?
  7. Can a notary officiate a wedding?
  8. How do you ask someone to officiate your wedding?
  9. What does the officiant say at a wedding?
  10. How much does a wedding officiant cost?
  11. How does someone become a wedding officiant?
  12. How long does it take to become a wedding officiant?
  13. What do you need to be a wedding officiant?
  14. How do I get my wedding officiant license?
  15. What should I wear to officiate a wedding?
  16. How much do wedding officiants make?
Q: Introduction
A:
Planning a wedding is a lot of work. You have numerous tasks and responsibilities. Even if you opt to hire a wedding planner, your input is required for everything. One of the decisions you need to make is who will marry you. Choosing your wedding officiant can be a challenging undertaking.

If you have a religious background and are a regular member of a church, synagogue or other house of worship, the choice is probably easy. But if not, you may want something less traditional. You can choose a professional or ask a close friend or family member if they would be willing to officiate the ceremony. These FAQs can help you make a decision about your wedding officiant.
Q: What is a wedding officiant?
A:
A wedding officiant, also called marriage officiant, is an individual with the legal authority to perform wedding ceremonies. Local judges and clergy members commonly act as wedding officiants. But, nearly anyone can obtain the necessary certification to become an officiant, although requirements vary from state to state.
Q: What does a wedding officiant do?
A:
The main role of a wedding officiant is to lead and perform the marriage ceremony. They must follow state law to ensure the union becomes official. Wedding officiants draft what they’ll say at the ceremony, often with input from the engaged couple. Some of their associated duties are signing and filing the marriage license.
Q: Can you officiate your own wedding?
A:
Officiating your own wedding is referred to as self-solemnizing. This practice is only legal in a few states, including Colorado, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Nevada, Kansas, Maine, Illinois, California, and Washington, D.C. The rules governing self-solemnizing in these jurisdictions differ. All states legally recognize self-uniting marriages that are properly performed in a state where they're permitted.
Q: What do you call a person who officiates a wedding?
A:
A marriage officiant’s title depends on who they are and what they do. For example, clergy members are called reverend, father, minister, rabbi, pastor. Common titles of civil marriage officiants are judge, your honor, magistrate, or mayor. Friends and family members who get temporary officiant status usually have no title.
Q: Who can officiate a wedding?
A:
The individuals who are allowed to officiate a wedding depends on the laws of the state where the ceremony is performed. Typically, most clergy members and certain civil officers can perform marriage ceremonies. Many states also permit other individuals to obtain temporary officiant authorization or to become ordained to perform a marriage.
Q: Can a notary officiate a wedding?
A:
Public notaries may perform marriage ceremonies in only a few states. They include Florida, Maine, South Carolina, Montana, and Nevada. Of course, a notary may officiate a wedding in other states if the state they’re in allows individuals to become wedding officiants, and the notary follows those guidelines.
Q: How do you ask someone to officiate your wedding?
A:
If a couple wants a family member or close friend to officiate their wedding, there are a few creative ways to ask. Many companies that provide credentials for marriage officiants also sell “Will You Marry Us?” gift packages to help couples ask the person they’ve chosen if they'll officiate.
Q: What does the officiant say at a wedding?
A:
The couple must make a declaration of intent, saying they’re legally committing to one another and want to enter a marriage contract. Also, the officiant has to verbally signify the couple is legally wed. Other than that, the officiant has great flexibility in what to say.
Q: How much does a wedding officiant cost?
A:
Wedding officiant fees vary greatly. Some factors in determining cost include location, profession, experience, and relationship to the couple. There’s typically no charge with a personal officiant, although the couple may offer to pay for their certification. Professional officiants cost an average of $400 to $800, while newbies charge about $100 to $250.
Q: How does someone become a wedding officiant?
A:
Start with a visit or a call to your county courthouse. Ask the clerk if your state permits private individuals to become wedding officiants. If so, ask if you can be ordained online. Search for an online service. Pay and complete the form to be ordained. You may need to attend a class.
Q: How long does it take to become a wedding officiant?
A:
Online services to become ordained as a wedding officiant are usually quick and uncomplicated. Most only take about five to 10 minutes to complete the application. However, the hard copies of the necessary credentials may not arrive for about one to two weeks.
Q: What do you need to be a wedding officiant?
A:
Clergy members and civil officers who can perform wedding ceremonies by state law must meet the qualifications for their professions. Private wedding officiants who get ordained solely to perform ceremonies typically don’t need more than a credit card and online access. But, check with your state laws to learn what’s required.
Q: How do I get my wedding officiant license?
A:
It’s not necessary to have a license to become a wedding officiant in every state. However, states that allow private individuals to become officiants usually require that they be ordained. Many jurisdictions let you complete this process online, but be sure to review the applicable state and county statutes before getting ordained.
Q: What should I wear to officiate a wedding?
A:
It’s best to discuss clothing options with the couple you’re marrying. Ask if they have a preference and follow their lead. If they have no input, choose an outfit that’s suitable for the type of ceremony, whether it be formal, casual, trendy, or something else.
Q: How much do wedding officiants make?
A:
Individuals who perform weddings professionally make an average of $400 to $800 per ceremony, plus mileage fees. They may also charge a fee to participate in the wedding rehearsal. Other optional services, like personalized ceremonies and custom embellishments, may incur additional costs. It’s also customary to tip the officiant.